How To Stay Fit And Motivated During The Holidays

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The Holidays. The time of year where we gather around large amounts of food with the people we love and stuff our faces until we fall asleep for a bit. There really is nothing more satisfying than eating all you like. Then comes the regret and the nightmare thoughts of stepping on the scale only to jump off in disbelief. ‘I didn’t possibly binge that much did I?’ If this is a recurring theme for you during this time of year, then this will help sort you out. Here are a few ways that you can stay in shape (not the barrel kind) that are easy if you stick to it.

Involve Others

One of the main things that is a con for most folks is that exercising is normally a solo effort. This can be quite intimidating for the unmotivated. If you can get a friend or family member to join with you, it can break up the monotony of the lonesome workout. You can also use this time for bonding with family while staying fit. You’d be surprised how far a bit of positive encouragement can go. Even joining a gym together can be very empowering for inspiration.

Childlike Good Times

Remember how much fun it was to run out with friends or family on a snowy day and just throw snow at each other? It’s still super fun. You probably just haven’t for a while. Taking a break from the touchscreens and televisions and cutting loose outdoors is a great way to get the blood pumping. This is also a great way to have fun with the kids and get in that cardio that you wanted to. Even building a snowman can get the heart rate up.

TV For Workout Time

Instead of putting on that awesome show that you’ve been waiting to watch, put in an exercise video. This can be great if your not much into going to the gym and you can easily involve the family here too. Little ones especially get a kick out of watching mom or dad exercise. The parents and the kids can have a blast and stay healthier at the same time. YouTube is a great source for random exercise videos to browse as well.

Have A Goal For Yourself

This is the most critical one to do. If there is no goal, then you are not working toward anything. It doesn’t have to be a huge goal like Mr. Universe or something, but have a realistic goal that you can crush with confidence. Doing this with every step of your fitness plan will keep you motivated to succeed.

5 Benefits of Taking Art Classes in College

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For years, there have been debates over rather art study is just fun and play or if it really holds true value. Since then, there have been many studies conducted on the effects of art classes in school and what these studies reveal may surprise you.

According to organizational research, high school teachers, college professors and more, taking art classes in college provides the following 5 benefits:

Improves Academic Performance

As it turns out, art education provides valuable critical thinking skills that can help students achieve overall success in all areas of study. A study conducted by two authors, which focused on the benefits of art classes in school, observed a group of high school students, three from a public urban high school and two from a private performing arts school, for a period of one year. The results of the study concluded that the visual arts classes provided a broad range of benefits to participants including meaningful problem solving skills, perseverance through frustration and enabled students to make clear connections between schoolwork and the outside world. According to the authors, “Students who study the arts seriously are taught to see better, to envision, to persist, to be playful and learn from mistakes to make critical judgments and justify such judgments”(New York Times).

Improved Artistic Ability

Art classes help improve artistic ability in students entering the arts and entertainment field as a profession. According to the same study conducted by the authors, art classes also improved artistic ability in participants. The arts and entertainment industry is a global, multi-billion dollar industry, which is also great for the economy and poverty stricken communities. According to an article published by Forbes, more than 30 celebrities have charitable contributions and funds dedicated to giving back to poverty stricken communities (Forbes).

Improves Business and Professional Applications

Art is a universal language, which means it can benefit every industry. From advertising and marketing campaigns to architecture and even interior design, artistic concepts and creative design are valued by businesses all over the world.

Good for Society

Art classes increase depth perception, so students are taught to view the world as two dimensional as opposed to one dimensional, which in turn, teaches them alternative ways to look at things. This is great for the future of our society, as it creates artistic creators and innovative leaders who can improve the world through creative problem solving, envisioning skills and inventing to address important issues such as global warming, people relations and more.

Provides Personal Enrichment

Art classes teach personal expression, which enables students to express their emotions, thoughts, unique experiences and more, which not only helps the world see through their eyes, but also teaches them to see through the eyes of others. This teaches empathy, understanding and tolerance, which is also great for our society. Participation in art projects also helps students cope with the pressures of life and difficult situations. In fact, doctors often recommend their patients participate in self expression through art as a way to help lower blood pressure and stress (Seminole State College). And since there’s no right or wrong way to do it, it also helps boost self esteem.

Art classes in college provides a lot of benefits, which proves it’s more than just fun, and in many cases, can be an important part of the curriculum. In fact, studies also show that schools with strong art programs tend to outperform schools that don’t (New York Times).